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Hummingbird moth-macro and video

At the end of September, I was walking among the beautiful flowers of the flower center's garden.
This was the first time I ever saw a hummingbird moth.
At first I wasn't even paying attention, I thought it's a big bee. Then another one came, and another. They made such a noise that I had to inspect them more closely. They were sipping nectar from some pink flowers, through a long needle-like tube, while hovering their body in the air.
I was so excited, I thought they were hummingbirds. I've never seen a hummingbird either, but I was familiar with their feeding technique and their backwards flight.
They flew so fast that I couldn't see with my eyes their exact form and I ended up with just a blurred spot on my photos.
This is a Hummingbird Hawk moth feeding on a phlox flower.
Hummingbird Hawk moth feeding on a plox flower
The photo is courtesy of Wikipedia editor J-E Nystr'm (User:Janke), Finland. The wing action is frozen in this photo by using electronic flash.

Yet, this was a must have capture, so I started my camera. Hypnotized by their zipping flight and being afraid of scaring them off, I was not able to hold the camera quite still either but the result is acceptable.


Back home, searching on the web for similar photos, I found out that they are

Hummingbird moths

The Hummingbird moth is not just any ordinary moth.
Unlike other moths, Hummingbird moth is active during daytime, feeding in the morning and at dusk.
Those needle-like straws through which it feeds are called a proboscis. They can uncurl it and stick it deep within tubular flowers such as phlox, petunias, honeysuckle, and trumpet vine.

The adult Hummingbird Hawk moth has a ritualistic, daily feeding schedule and seems to fly his tour by the clock. Once it finds a flower source it likes, it becomes a loyal visitor and returns to it to feed, at approximately the same time each day.
Isn't that nice?
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15 comments:

Kathy said...

Aren't these just the most interesting little creatures?

SquirrelQueen said...

Great capture of the hummingbird moth on video, I have watched them and know how fast they can move. Well done on the macro photo too.

Judy said...

I am not going to complain about the quality of the video - I would likely be just as shaky at seeing something that amazing!!!

Mommy2Four said...

WOW! Great shot!

Evelyn S. said...

Aren't they the most fascinating creatures? Our elderly neighbor had a flowerbed of phlox many years ago, and the moths LOVED them. Each evening, our two young sons got so excited when the moths visited the flowers. Wonderful photo!

Genie said...

I think your video was just great and to see that hummingbird moth in action was worth its weight n gold. I can’t wait for my husband to wake up in the morning to sow it to him. We adore our hummingbird, but have NEVER know of a hummingbird moth much less seen one. Your shot of him is wonderful.

justine said...

what a fantastic shot

leavesnbloom said...

I love seeing these in the garden. My only photo this year of them is a blurr and the night I could have taken a shot it had gone by the time I had gone back in to get the camera.

Gardening in a Sandbox said...

I captured a photo of a hummingbird moth a couple of years ago on my white phlox. It is quite a site to see them. Great shot.

Poetic Shutterbug said...

A fantastic shot and video. It's a treat to see them that up close and personal.

Kilauea Poetry said...

Hi there..this is a beautiful setting and a lovely capture! We have one similar (we like to call humingbirds) but really it is a Hawaiian Sphinx Moth. Looks very similar and hard for me to photograph. I enjoyed the video with the soft music in the bacground! My best:)

Self Sagacity said...

We live in a city of hummingbird heaven. What a great shot. The Hbirds are too sensitive for me to get that close.

The Gardener said...

I haven't seen something like this. Interesting little creature. You framed it so beautiful with its wings were widely spread.

Ann said...

strange, the flower looks just like a periwinkle.

Mama Monkey said...

oh my!! AWESOME!

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